How to Express Yourself Through Fashion

How to Express Yourself Through Fashion

What we wear expresses who we are and how we want others to view us. Clothes reflect our personality and are a form of our self-expression. While someone else may have the same dress, sweater or blazer, it’s up to our own creativity to how we wear and accessorize our outfit of the day.

Getting dressed in the morning should make you happy. OK…actually getting up and putting on clothes might not make you thrilled (especially if you aren’t a morning person), but you should never leave the house feeling meh or unhappy with you or your appearance. Your clothes should make your day a little brighter.

So what do your clothes say about you? Are you colorful and creative? Do you love patterns? Or are you more monochrome? There is no one way to interpret personal style, and, really, life’s too short to look like everyone else. Take a trend and make it yours. Or dress uniquely you.

If fashion isn’t your thing, but you hate how you look and feel when you leave the house, it’s easy to slowly build a wardrobe that speaks to you…and looks like you. I once dressed in whatever anyone purchased for me, and I had no idea what ‘my style’ really entailed. It took discovering a fashion blog and ready style stories to figure out what I wanted to wear and how I wanted to wear it. My wardrobe includes vintage and modern (even a 70’s house dress that I belt as a funky dress!), and I know the power of a simple accessory.

Here’s how to embrace your style and figure out how to dress for you:

On a budget? Get thrifty!

Do not underestimate the value of a great thrift store. You can buy amazing items for very little, and, the best part is that buying thrift also keeps clothes out of the landfills. Some of my most favorite items were purchased in thrift stores (yes, including the 70s house dress!). When thrifting, try everything on before buying. Many people wear leggings and t-shirts so they can try clothes over their base layers. Keep in mind that sizes vary greatly through the decades. For 1960s skirts, I wear a size 14. But in modern sizes, that’s more like a size four or six. If you’re a little apprehensive about venturing into the thrift universe, check out Go Green Travel Green’s thrift shopping guide for shopping tips and the best items to avoid/buy.

Accessorize

Accessories are one of the easiest ways to incorporate your personality into your outfit. I love plain monochromatic looks like a simple black dress paired with funky accessories. I keep everything, though, so I also own massive old 90s earrings as well as grungy chokers. Embrace your inner goth with dark lunar accessories or add a feminine flair with a ribbon choker or delicate stud earrings. One of my favorite accessories is a faux wood owl pendant…I wear it with more boho styled looks.

 

Color Your World

The colors you wear might reflect your mood. But get a feel for what hues look best with your complexion. Sea blues, reds or pastels may brighten your complexion. Black is universally flattering, and so are navy, grey and brown hues. I have to steer clear of beige, though…it washes me out. Try on different hues and see how they look. Sometimes wearing bolder patterns or brighter colors may help perk up a grey day! Feeling trendy? Grab something in Ultra Violet, Pantone’s Color of the Year.

Attitude is Everything

No matter what it is you put on, if you’re not comfortable wearing it you won’t feel good. The secret to style is confidence. When you look good, you feel good. But if you grab a shirt or pants that don’t feel good or make you self-conscious, it will affect how you carry yourself. You don’t have to adopt the trends if they don’t make you comfortable. Dress for you and in a style that makes you feel good.

Fashion and personal style should reflect your personality. Clothes should paint a picture of you, and they shouldn’t feel like a costume. Play with different hues, trends and accessories to find the style and look that speaks to you…and makes you feel unstoppable.

Article submitted by Shannon Lochwood